Saturday, December 29, 2012

Is it time we elect a South Asian from the Fraser Valley and send him/her to Victoria or Ottawa?

Are South Asians In The Lime Light Or Sidelines?

 

 I can’t help but ponder when it comes to politics…are South Asians just standing pretty on the sidelines? With respect to the  Moe Gill and BC Liberal fiasco the bottom line here is Gill should have been an opportunity to a fair nomination process -something he has been working at for some time. Don’t get me wrong Darryl Plecas and Gill would be both outstanding candidates. I am looking at this controversy from a totally different perspective and that is it would have been historical to seen a candidate from the South Asian community who would have had a reasonable chance of getting elected and representing us in Victoria. Unfortunately, the Fraser Valley region has always struggled to get ethnic minorities elected to public office whether it be to Victoria or Ottawa. Until a city like Abbotsford which is one of most diverse communities in Canada elects someone from the South Asian community being the largest visible minority group in the area the cultural divide will continue to exist in many forms. A hurdle that has yet to be conquered. Here was a perfect calling and it was unfortunately taken away undemocratically. In a nutshell, too many South Asian candidates have ran provincially and federally in the past, but were never in a position to win in the first place. This has to change and running to lose shouldn’t be an option if we are going to break cultural barriers. I am not suggesting we strictly vote on someone’s race, but if there is an opportunity to bring new voices and ethnic backgrounds into the political discussion our community becomes a better place because of it. For this to all become a reality there has to be also stronger unity within the South Asian community as a whole.
This leads us the big question: Are South Asians taken seriously in the political game or they just people who watch on the sidelines and vote every four years? Well, they have certainly watched for a long time here in the Valley and it’s time for this to change.


Ken Herar is a Champion of Diversity and also the Founder of Cycling4Diversity. He can be reached at kenherar@gmail.com or at his blog at http://www.kenherar.blogspot.com

Saturday, December 22, 2012

Audio interview with LifeTime Learning Centre on our families journey

Mission History – The Sikh Community

August 15, 2012 − by LLC_Admin − in Education, Industry & Business, Multicultural Traditions, My Story, Oral History − No Comments
Ken and Tok Herar discuss their family’s immigration to Canada. They explain the factors that led to the decision to leave India, how they arranged to immigrate to Canada, the reasons for their desire to come to Canada and why they chose to settle in Mission in particular. They discuss the history of the growth and development of the Sikh community in Mission, the state of the Sikh business community, and such community institutiions as the Gurdwara and school.
Title: Mission History – The Sikh Community
Box: I
File: 9
Topic: The Mission Sikh Community
Interviewer: Susan Mathieson
Interviee(s): Ken Herar, Tok Herar
Date: June 15, 2005
Scope: 1 audio tape
Length: 90 min.
Summary: The interviewees discuss how and why they immigrated to Canada and Mission, business, the Mission Sikh community, temple and school
     



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Wednesday, December 5, 2012

Let's stop Fireworks in neighborhoods during Halloween and Diwali.

 

Fireworks, talent show and solid Samaritans

 
 
The use of fireworks is still a major concern and illegal in our communities. In Abbotsford, more than 50 pounds were seized during Halloween by Abbotsford Fire Rescue Service.
On that day, I had to walk over to the neighbour's and ask them politely to stop firing their missiles over people's homes for safety reasons. The answer I received in return from the father of the kids was, "Don't worry, they're being careful."
Also during Diwali, explosions could be heard loud and clear from all over, causing much discomfort for residents and animals.
My dog was terrified and ran from room to room for hours, barking non-stop.
Since we all live in this town, we need to think about our neighbours and the people who live around us. I don't care if it's Halloween or any other celebration, the fact remains that fireworks are illegal.
 I attended the Sada Virsa Sa-da Gaurav Bhangra Club talent show in Abbotsford last week as judges. The students prepared speeches on Diwali and Sikh soldiers in the Canadian Army. This club is a non-profit organization which promotes Punjabi culture through teaching Punjabi folk dance (Bhangra and Gidhha), and Punjabi cultural values.
SVSG Bhangra Club was formed in 2001 by Jas-bir Singh Pannu, who said, "Sada Virsa Sada Gaurav enforces a drug-free message, hoping to instill enough self-respect and confidence in the young dancers to resist the temptation to engage in drug and gang activity that may lure them in their teens."
The team of judges were extremely impressed by the children's talent and the time and effort they put into each topic. Selecting a winner was not easy.
I'd like to make special mention of two people in our community who went out of their way to make the lives of others better. I don't know their names but their actions speak louder than words.
A couple weeks ago an ad was put in the Times regarding a miniature schnauzer that had been lost and picked up. The lady who found the dog made every effort to find the owner so they could be reunited with their pet.
Through her diligence in trying to do something good, the owners saw the ad and were able to be reconnected with their dog.
Just this past week I gave an anniversary card. They placed it in there purse and was running around town doing errands and it accidentally fell out.
She later realized it was missing and called one of the shops. Thankfully it was picked up by someone and left at the shop to be picked up. We are both grateful to the woman who took the time to do this and now we have it back.
Doing a good deed, even when you don't know the person, can mean a great deal to someone else.
 Ken Herar is a freelance columnist, writing for the Times.

Friday, November 30, 2012

Cycling4Diversity 2012 team 1..2..3..destination Victoria

Support Cycling4Diversity by connecting with people through walking, runnning or biking and delivering the message

       Rotary Club C4D Presentation November 27th, 2012


Dear Rotarians,
I am honored to speak hear today with some of the members from the Cycling4Diversity
 team . Rotary has been part of my family for over a half a century with my father having 50 years perfect attendance. I was also a Rotarian for a short time and  know the good Rotary does for the community and I thank you for your service. One of our members from our team is also a Rotarian Kulwinder Singh Dhillon from Surrey.   
- Cycling4Diversity was created in 2011 when a team of cyclist rode from Mission to

Victoria from May 18th- May 21st  to celebrate World Day for Cultural Diversity a

declaration by the United Nations.

- The Cycling4Diversity team or C4D as we like to refer to it completed its second annual

ride this past May from 22nd to 25th. The ride began by replanting a Ginko Biblo tree at

Griner Park in Mission, which was destroyed by vandals during the previous year.

- The C4D 2012 ride more than doubled this year with the amount of cyclist and stops. The 7 core riders and 5 support staff visited
9 cities during the 4 days and spoke to thousands of people. The cities included: Mission,

Abbotsford, Langley, Surrey, New Westminster, Burnaby, Vancouver, Richmond and Victoria.

The team made close to 40 stops visiting schools and organizations and speaking to people on

topics of: culture, inclusion and racism. In our wonderful city in the country we visited six schools and had a reception at Matsqui Recreation Centre where the Abbotsford Fire & Rescue put their ladder trucks together and welcomed us.

-  During this years ride the team received 8 proclamations including one from the

Province of British Columbia naming it “Cycling4Diversity Week in BC” from May 20th-26th.
The 7 other proclamations came from local cities which hosted us referring to it as “Cycling4Diversity Day”.

-   C4D is more than just a bike ride, its about the message which is summed up in our slogan, “ Building bridge of dialogue one city at a time”. The message that we

delivered during the past two years was to encourage Canadians including our youth to

make an effort to reach out to someone from a different culture, race or religion. Whether it be walking, running or biking we encourage people to reach out and support our message.
 
Cultural Diversity is not just only focusing on our unique differences, its actually about building

relationships with each other and that should always remain our primary focus.       

-  Cultural Diversity is Canada’s greatest strength and how are nation was built, but the biggest challenge we currently face with cultural diversity not only here in Abbotsford,

but also in other jurisdictions across Canada is the growing cultural isolation.

As being a local columnist with the Abbotsford Times and shedding light on such

topics I am hearing more and more that are communities are operating in silos. In 1976, there were

only six ethnic enclaves in all of Canada, however, according to the latest statistics there

are more than a 110 ethnic enclaves in Metro Vancouver and 230 across Canada. Whether

it be in our schools, neighbourhoods, workplaces or sports teams spreading awareness is

crucial as we move forward towards the future. There is no magical formula on how we

can make all of this work or do we have all the answers.  But, pointing the finger nor

pointing blame is not the solution either.

-  The C4D initiative is what we would like our young diversity leaders of tomorrow to

 be part of one day . One of the many questions we received during the journey

was: How long have you all known each other? Well, more than half the team had just

met the morning of the ride showing our audiences particularly the students with a little

effort barriers can be broken down and create everlasting friendships.

- The fact remains clear that we should never stop building relationships in a multicultural

society. The moment we remain silent walls get created.  

 We only had a couple of short months to plan the 2012 ride and I am proud to share with

all of you it was a huge success. The support from local service providers and sponsors

was fantastic. Rotary has been a huge supporter for the past two years  The team was

deeply moved by the generosity and was honoured to carry this message throughout the

200km journey.

-  Over 300 Cycling4Diversity T-shirts and 800 wristbands were handed out for free this

year. Our message to each recipient was you’re not only a supporter of C4D, but you’re

now part of the team.

-  Since the May ride the C4D team have been making several presentations in the

community, including a inner-city ride in Mission in October where we visited four

schools which we didn’t have the opportunity during the past two years. We are also

looking at doing a inner city ride in Abbotsford visiting schools sometime earlier in the

new year.

- Plans are underway for the 2013 ride being only 6 months away which will take place

from May 21st to May 25th. I have some exciting news for next year, the team will leave

from Victoria and will finish in Abbotsford on May 25th. Since, most of the riders come

from the Fraser Valley area it makes sense to have a home coming and we‘re always

looking for partnerships to make this a event a special day in our community . Our long-

term goals for C4D is to expand it across Canada and hopefully make it a global

initiative. When there is a common goal there is no choice than staying committed. 

Wednesday, November 28, 2012

Cycling4Diversity Bill MacGregor at Victoria High School. Leading the discussion around cultural diversity.

Cycling4Diversity team member Bill MacGregor capturing the moment at Victoria High on May 25th, 2012. 

Cycling4Diversity (C4D) present t-shirt to Abbotsford Rotary Club

Cycling4Diversity (C4D) Preet Rai, Kulwinder Singh Dhillon and Ken Herar present Abbotsford Rotary Club President Andrew Franklin with a (C4D) t-shirt.

Saturday, November 17, 2012

Cycling4Diversity team in action at Abbotsford Senior on May 2012 tour

Cycling4Diversity thanks Simon Fraser University for their support during May 2012 tour

Cycling4Diversity teams visits and pay respects to Gur Sikh Temple during May 2012 tour

Cycling4Diversity welcomed into Langley during May 2012 tour

Cycling4Diversity presents Victoria Firefighters with T-shirt

Sarina Di Martino Derkesen presents Victoria MLA Lana Popham with Cycling4Diversity T-shirt

Mission South Asians Get Their Queen’s Diamond Jubliee Medals

Pitt Meadows-Maple Ridge- Mission Member of Parliament Randy Kamp presents Ken Herar with Queen’s Diamond Jubliee medal on Nov 3rd.

 
Mission Indo-Canadians Get Their Queen’s Diamond Jubliee Medals


MISSION – Eleven Mission and one Maple Ridge resident, including two Indo-Canadians, were presented the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee medals recently by Pitt Meadow-Maple Ridge- Mission Member of Parliament Randy Kamp at the Cedarbrooke Chateau in Mission.
The Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Medal is a commemorative medal created to mark the celebration of the 60th anniversary of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II’s accession to the Throne as Queen of Canada. The Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal is a tangible way for Canada to honour Her Majesty for her service to this country. At the same time, it serves to honour significant contributions and achievements by Canadians.
The following names were called to receive their medals: Dr. Marco Terwiel from Maple Ridge, Claire Clemo, Amanda Peebles, Leslie Reed, Sgt. Bob Reed, Dave Bryant, Don Lobb, Cal Crawford, Ken Herar, Vir Singh Pannu and Sherry Edmunds-Flett were all recognized for their service to Mission. Recipient Fred Clarke of Mission was absent from the event.
“All of the recipients have stood out … as great examples of dedication and service to others. By their consistent commitment to the community, these recipients have made their community a better place to live,” said a press release from Kamp’s office.
Edmunds-Flett said, “ I feel humbled to receive the medal. Glen and I are proud of the contributions that the LINC Society has made and of the community we live in that allows us to do so. The medal to me reflects the diversity that makes me proud to be a Canadian.”
Dr. Terwiel said, “ I work to my best of my ability both for individual patients and health care to improve both. It is a good feeling when others appreciate your efforts to create a better society. All the recipients have this particular approach to life.”
“Myself, I am definitely humbled to receive this recognition. It caught me totally off guard when I received the phone call a few weeks ago,” said LINK columnist and community activist Ken Herar.
“My involvement and efforts have never been about medals or awards. I have always enjoyed working with people towards the common good of our community and nation. Life is about choices and what we choose to represent and the legacy we leave behind. Cultural diversity is Canada’s greatest strength and it’s not only celebrating differences; it’s actually about building relationships and that should remain our primary focus. I have met some inspiring people like Cycling4Diversity Co-founder and Executive Coordinator Sarina Di Martino Derksen who have remained passionate about this initiative and it’s with individuals like her that real and longterm differences can become a reality. There is a lifetime responsibility that comes with this recognition and is something that I am committed too I jotted a few lines down before the ceremony and here is what I wrote to share. “Life is about opportunities and sometime it’s in the hands of someone that can open or close it. I encourage everyone here to be that window of opportunity because sometimes that’s all it takes in making a difference.”

Cycling4Diversity team visits Killarney Secondary during May tour

Thursday, November 15, 2012

Page from the South Asian Post on Queen's medal


Please support GirlKIND

 
Less than a year ago, Deesh Sekhon a mother and photographer who
resides in Abbotsford, BC had her eyes opened to the issue of
Gendercide. Gendercide is the elimination of specific gender, in this
case, girls through infanticide, sex-selective abortions, neglect or
murder to avoid a deep-set custom in Indian culture, paying dowry to
future husbands' families. Its difficult to comprehend this still
exist in our global society today. All I can say is, " Shame, Shame
and Shame on those who choose to hurt innocent children".

It broke her heart to realize what was happening in many parts of the
world.  The more she read the more disturbing it became.  “Girls were
being abandoned in the streets left to meet their deaths just because
they were born a girl.  I was left feeling hopeless, sad and defeated.
 This issue was epic, how could I possibly make a difference,” said
Sekhon.  As each day passed she continued to read and shared her
stories online.

Throughout her discoveries, she saw a little glimmer of hope. There
was a very special home in Punjab that was doing amazing work with
baby girls that were being abandoned, uncared for and unwanted by
their parents.

Unique Home in India is run by a wonderful woman named Prakash Kaur,
she and her assistants together help raise approximately 60 girls.
She rescues girls from the sides of the roads, garbage bins, fields
and some leave their unwanted baby girls in the provided cradle.
After speaking with the orphanage Sekhon launched her “Save A Girl”
campaign to help raise awareness on this issue as well as to collect
personal care items and clothing for these girls. “It was a small
step, but that step helped me heal on the inside”.

“These girls reminded me of myself and the what “ifs” began echoing in
my head and what if it was me. I was given the opportunity at a
fulfilling life in a beautiful country, the very least I could do was
be a voice for them”.

With the help of her family, friends and the community the “Save A
Girl” campaign raised just under 1500 items that were hand delivered
to the girls by her relatives.  Since that time, She continues to
raise awareness and have discussions via social media on what could be
done on this issue. She has yet to travel to India, however, she
claims  her first trip to India is going to have so much purpose. “I
look forward to meeting these girls and being inspired by them to do
more”.

This past September Sekhon launched GirlKind Foundation. A non-profit
organization that  is serving as a great platform to help bring an end
to gendercide, gender discrimination and help support abandoned girls
all over the world. The goal is to continue to raise awareness on this
issue, create dialogue and motivate people to change. “Changing
cultural values is going to take time, dedication, awareness and
education.  Nine months ago, I would of have never imagined sitting in
the position I am today, but I feel I am doing my part to bring an end
to this,"said Sekhon.
 One of the first events GirlKIND held was a premiere screening of the
much anticipated documentary, “It’s A Girl.”. The evening was filled
with guest speakers and artists. People left very informed and
inspired to make a difference. This is just the beginning and more is
in the planning to create the necessary change needed says Sekhon..

Queen's Jubilee medals handed out in Mission

Queen's Jubilee medals handed out in Mission

Cross-section of community recognized

 
Eleven Mission and one Maple Ridge resident were presented the Queen's Diamond Jubilee medals by Pitt Meadows-Maple Ridge-Mission Member of Parliament Randy Kamp at the Cedarbrooke Chateau in Mission recently.
The Queen's Diamond Jubilee Medal is a commemorative medal created to mark the celebration of the 60th anniversary of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II's accession to the throne as Queen of Canada. The Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal is a tangible way for Canada to honour Her Majesty for her service to this country. At the same time, it serves to honour significant contributions and achievements by Canadians.
The following names were called to receive their medals: Dr. Marco Terwiel from Maple Ridge, Claire Clemo, Amanda Peebles, Leslie Reed, Sgt. Bob Reed, Dave Bryant, Don Lobb, Cal Crawford, Vir Singh Pannu, Sherry Edmunds-Flett, and myself, Ken Herar, were recognized for service to Mission. Recipient Fred Clarke of Mission was absent.
"All of the recipients have stood out . . . as great examples of dedication and service to others. By their consistent commitment to the community, these recipients have made their community a better place to live," stated Kamp in a press release.
There were also five other Mission residents who received their medals at city hall by MLAs Marc Dalton, Randy Hawes and Mayor Ted Adlem: Steve Sharpe, Ron Leger, Rex Blane, Val Hundert and Barb Feh-rmann.
"Its been a joy to be involved in many organizations in Mission for the past 20 years and [it's] a deep honour to unexpectedly receive this medal," said Hundert
Edmunds-Flett agreed. "I feel humbled to receive the medal. Glen and I are proud of the contributions that the LINC Society has made and of the community we live in that allows us to do so. The medal to me reflects the diversity that makes me proud to be a Canadian."
I am definitely humbled to receive this recognition. It caught me totally off guard when I received the phone call a few weeks ago.
My involvement and efforts have never been about medals or awards. I have always enjoyed working with people towards the common good of our community and nation.
Life is about choices and what we choose to represent and the legacy we leave behind.
Cultural diversity is Canada's greatest strength and it's not only celebrating differences; it's actually about building relationships and that should remain our primary focus.
I have met some inspiring people like Cycling4Diversity co-founder and executive coordinator Sarina Di Martino Derksen who has remained passionate about this initiative. It's with individuals like her that real and long-term differences can become a reality.
There is a lifetime responsibility that comes with this recognition and it's something that I am committed to. I jotted down a few lines before the ceremony that I want to share:
"Life is about opportunities and sometimes they're in the hands of someone who can open or close them. I encourage everyone here to be that window of opportunity because sometimes that's all it takes in making a difference."

Sunday, November 11, 2012

Cycling4Diversity visits Simon Fraser University in Surrey

EVENTS FOR May 23 2012
Cycling 4 Diversity


The Cycling4Diversity team will be rolling into Surrey City Centre tomorrow, Wednesday May 23rd at 1:30pm celebrating the United Nations proclaimed “World Day for Cultural Diversity for Dialogue and Development”.
The Cycling4Diversity team will be making this stop at SFU, as one of more than 20 stops on a four day cycling trip through nine cities. The team’s mission is to raise awareness about Diversity issues in our communities.
This is an invitation to come out and cheer the team on, meet the riders and enjoy refreshments. Councilor Mary Martin from the City of Surrey will be the keynote speaker. The team will be here for approximately one hour. Please see attached invitation.
Please join Michelle Mackay, Retail & Community Relations Manager of Central City Mall, and Fraser Health Diversity Services in welcoming the team to our very diverse community. A reception will be held in the Dale B. Regehr Hall at Simon Fraser University from 1:30-2:30pm. 
Help us celebrate Diversity, a core foundation of the community we live, work and go to school in. Please rsvp to susan.rink@fraserhealth.ca

Cycling4Diversity team member Kulwinder Singh Dhillon presents Ecole Mission Secondary Vice Principal Hardeep Grewal with T-shirt

Tuesday, November 6, 2012

Queen's Diamond Jubilee Medal reception in Mission

  Receiving Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Medal with family and friends

Herar family medal
Eleven Mission and one Maple Ridge resident were presented
the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee medals this past Saturday
by Pitt Meadow-Maple Ridge-Mission Member of Parliament
Randy Kamp at the Cedarbrooke Chateau in Mission.
The Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Medal is a commemorative medal created to
mark the celebration of the 60th anniversary of Her Majesty Queen
Elizabeth II’s accession to the Throne as Queen of Canada. The Queen
Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal is a tangible way for Canada to
honour Her Majesty for her service to this country. At the same time,
it serves to honour significant contributions and achievements by
Canadians.
The following names were called to receive their medals: Dr. Marco
Terwiel from Maple Ridge, Claire Clemo, Amanda Peebles, Leslie Reed,
Sgt. Bob Reed, Dave Bryant, Don Lobb, Cal Crawford, Ken Herar, Vir
Singh Pannu and Sherry Edmunds-Flett were all recognized for their
service to Mission. Recipient Fred Clarke of Mission was absent from
the event.”

Pitt Meadows-Maple Ridge- Mission Member of Parliament Randy Kamp
presents Ken Herar with Queen’s Diamond Jubliee medal on Nov 3rd.

“All of the recipients have stood out … as great examples of
dedication and service to others. By their consistent commitment to
the community, these recipients have made their community a better
place to live,” said a press release from Kamp’s office.
Edmunds-Flett said, “ I feel humbled to receive the medal. Glen and I
are proud of the contributions that the LINC Society has made and of
the community we live in that allows us to do so. The medal to me
reflects the diversity that makes me proud to be a Canadian.”
Dr. Terwiel said, “ I work to my best of my ability both for
individual patients and health care to improve both. It is a good
feeling when others appreciate your efforts to create a better
society. All the recipients have this particular approach to life.”
Myself, I am definitely humbled to receive this recognition. It caught
me totally off guard when I received the phone call a few weeks ago.
My involvement and efforts have never been about medals or awards. I
have always enjoyed working with people towards the common good of our
community and nation. Life is about choices and what we choose to
represent and the legacy we leave behind. Cultural diversity is
Canada’s greatest strength and it’s not only celebrating differences;
it’s actually about building relationships and that should remain our
primary focus. I have met some inspiring people like Cycling4Diversity
Co-founder and Executive Coordinator Sarina Di Martino Derksen who
have remained passionate about this initiative and it’s with
individuals like her that real and longterm differences can become a
reality. There is a lifetime responsibility that comes with this
recognition and is something that I am committed too
I jotted a few lines down before the ceremony and here is what I wrote
to share. “Life is about opportunities and sometime it’s in the hands
of someone that can open or close it. I encourage everyone here to be
that window of opportunity because sometimes that’s all it takes in
making a difference.

Monday, November 5, 2012

Queen's Diamond Jubilee recipients in the Mission City Record



Picture of the recipients of the Queen's Diamond Jubliee

(Left to Right) Cal Crawford, Marco Terwiel, Dave Byrant, Don Lobb, Claire Clemo, Amanda Peebles, Leslie Reed,  Sherry Edmunds-Flett, Leslie Reed, Ken Herar Bob Reed, Vir Singh Pannu. (Missing: Fred Clarke)
Background information of recipients
Claire Clemo
Claire was born in Hong Kong to parents Alfred Bertram and Daisy Caroline Clemo of Northern Ireland. Her father Alfred spent time overseas serving with the British forces and it was during this time that Claire, along with her brother Roland, leaned on her mother and her aunt Claire Kathleen. Both her mother and aunt were a source of great strength and stability during these difficult years. By the age of nineteen, Claire had already circumnavigated the world and by the time she graduated from the University of British Columbia, she had been educated on three continents. Claire received her first teaching position in 1964 and would spend the next thirty-two years encouraging and motivating students. After twenty-five years of teaching, Claire returned to her studies and earned a Masters degree in education at UBC. Claire’s dedication and commitment to teaching made her one of Mission’s most revered teachers. Among her honours are the Queen’s Silver Jubilee Medal, the Rotary Club Distinguished Service Award, and two post-secondary scholarships in her name funded by the Braich family of Mission. Since retiring from teaching in 1996, Claire has remained active in the community volunteering her time and energy always in the theme of giving back and life-long learning.

Amanda Peebles
Amanda is an extraordinary example of someone overcoming great challenges to become a sensational citizen. She was born with a developmental disability which hampered her ability to communicate and to develop motor and social skills. Through a lot of hard work, determination, and help from her family, Amanda was able to overcome these challenges. After high school, Amanda enrolled in the TASK program at the University of the Fraser Valley where she received a diploma in food safety and first aid. She also studied in the Community Support program through the Mission Association for Community Living. Amanda has used her education and experience to give back to her community. She has volunteered with the Salvation Army, Meals on Wheels, the Illuminaria Festival, the food bank, and Pleasant View nursing home. She also became a Big Sister for youth with disabilities. Amanda has also participated in Special Olympics softball, soccer, floor hockey, bowling, and track and field and has won many medals.



Leslie Reed
Leslie has lived her life with the goal of bettering those around her. One way Leslie has accomplished this is through her voluntary service in the community. Leslie has coordinated more than two hundred barbecues throughout Mission and the Lower Mainland to raise money for charity. She has been part of Beta Sigma Phi for thirty-five years and is a former member of the Mission Kinettes. As the Director of the Mission Hospice Society, Leslie has coordinated the Mission Hospice Gala which is its premier fundraising event of the year. Leslie has also served as the executive for PAC’s at Albert McMahon Elementary, Heritage Park Secondary, and Hatzic Secondary. She also volunteered for “Ride to Live” which in 2010 raised over $300,000 for prostate cancer research. In 2010, Leslie and her family (Bob, Emily, Katherine, Dianna, Thomas) were named Citizens of the Year for overall volunteerism in the community. Leslie continues to serve her community with great effort and a caring spirit which has influenced those around her and encourages all to give back to better not only their own lives, but the lives of others.

Bob Reed
Sergeant Bob Reed is a member of the RCMP serving in the Traffic Services branch. Bob has been a member of Mission Kinsmen for eleven years holding all the executive positions. He has been the Director and President of the Mission Marlins Swim Club for twelve years and has held the position of Meet manager for various swim meets for the B.C. Summer Swim Association and the Fraser Valley High Schools swim championships. Bob has been the PAC Director for McMahon Elementary, Hatzic Secondary, and Heritage Park Secondary where he also served on the Policy Advisory Council. Bob was a founding member for the Ride for Dad Prostate Cancer Research ride and the Ride to Live Prostate Cancer Research ride which raised over $300,000 in 2010. He has been the coordinator of the RCMP Volunteer Ski Patrol at Hemlock Valley Resort for fifteen years. Bob has been honoured with a number of awards including the 2010 Mission Citizen of the Year award, Kinsmen Outstanding Maple Leaf Award, RCMP Golden Whistle Award, and the Officer In Charge Certificate of Appreciation for excellence in performance.

Marco Terwiel
Dr. Marco Terwiel was born in the Netherlands and graduated from the University of Utrecht in 1961 with an MD degree. He moved to the United States where he continued his medical training as a physician in Seattle. After obtaining his medical license, Marco and his wife moved to Maple Ridge in 1968. Since his arrival here Marco has been a very influential in the community. For more than 40 years, has been a well-respected family physician who is always willing to go above and beyond the call for those around him. Marco has continued to give back to the medical community by conducting seminars for medical students at the University of British Columbia. He has also been involved with many Rotary events all with a goal of creating a better world for others.

Dave Bryant
Dave Bryant has been married to Irene for forty-three years and they have two children and four grandchildren. He joined the Royal New Zealand Air Force in 1966 leaving, with the rank of Seargeant, to come to Canada in 1980. During his time with the Royal New Zealand Air Force, he served in New Zealand, Singapore, Australia, and Fiji and has been part of UN missions in Africa, Europe, and the Arctic. Dave is a recipient of the New Zealand Defense Service Medal. Since arriving in Canada, he has worked in the helicopter industry in Canada and abroad. Dave Bryant is currently the president of the Royal Canadian Legion Branch 57. Dave continues to be involved in a wide variety of community services in Mission including Canada Day celebrations and Remembrance Day services. Through his acts of service both in the military and in the community, Dave has proven to be an outstanding citizen of Canada.

Don Lobb
Don Lobb has served as the president of the Mission Association for Seniors Housing whose vision is “Caring for those who cared for us.” Through his efforts with this Association, Don has helped provide affordable housing options for seniors in the community.

Cal Crawford
In more than twenty years of living in Mission, Cal has contributed greatly to his community. At different times Cal has served as president, first vice president, second vice president, and director of the Mission Regional Chamber of Commerce, president of the Kinsmen Club of Mission, and has been an active Kinsmen for twenty years. Cal has also been the Chairman of the Candlelight Parade and the Chairman of the Mission Showcase. Cal was a founding member of the Mid-day Rotary Club of Mission serving as president in July 2007 and June 2008. Some of Cal’s achievements include the Special Citizen Recognition Award in 1992, Citizen of the Year award in 1995, and Business Leader of the Year Award in 2010. Cal’s contributions to the community have helped him become a very well-respected and trustworthy person who always looks to put others first.

Ken Herar
Ken earned his Bachelor’s degree in Sociology/Anthropology from the University of the Fraser Valley and a second Bachelor’s degree from Simon Fraser University in General Studies. Since then Ken has used his education to be a diversity columnist who has written for several publications and has spoken publically always promoting diversity. Ken was recognized for his efforts in 2007 when he received the Champion of Diversity award at the Fraser Valley Cultural Diversity Awards. In 2010, Ken received the Arts and Culture Service award from the District of Mission. Ken also took part in the skydiving plunge to promote multiculturalism in 2010. In 2011, Ken founded Cycling4Diversity, a team of cyclists who travelled for four days from Mission to Victoria speaking to thousands about diversity, culture and issues of racism. Ken continues to speak and write about the importance of multiculturalism and is a great example of how Canadians celebrate a uniquely diverse culture.

Sherry Edmunds-Flett
Sherry was born in Kingston, Ontario and graduated from Queen’s University in 1982 with a Bachelors degree in Sociology. Sherry continued on in her studies and earned a Bachelors degree in Education in English and Music. Later on, Sherry earned a Masters in African Area Studies from the University of California, Los Angeles and earned doctoral candidate status in History at Simon Fraser University. Sherry is a founding member of the Black Canadian Studies Association and a lifetime member of the Association of Black Women Historians. Sherry met her husband Glenn while he was in prison and teaching Adult Basic Education in provincial prisons. Sherry and Glenn then founded the Long-Term Inmates Now in the Community (L.I.N.C.) Society which seeks to positively intervene in the lives of persons sentenced to lengthy terms of incarceration and in the lives of their families. Sherry has successfully promoted her philosophy of restorative justice by helping offenders reintegrate into their communities to become positive contributors. Sherry’s efforts have brought hope to many who otherwise would have found themselves hopeless.

Vir Singh Pannu
Vir Singh Pannu served as a high school teacher from 1966-1982 and taught students Punjabi and music. In 1982, he moved to Malaysia where he served as a head Granthi, the principal religious official in Sikhism. In Malaysia he worked with a congregation in the area of drug prevention and betterment of all humanity. Since his arrival in Canada he has worked in various capacities as a preacher and has been involved in counseling cases of domestic issues. He always preaches and practices a peaceful and healthy way of life, drug and violence free. Many families have been touched by his gentle and nurturing nature.
 

Recipients Vir Singh Pannu & Ken Herar during Queen's Diamond Jubliee medal ceremony

Queen's Diamond Jubliee recipients Clarie Clemo & Ken Herar with their medals


One of my favorite photos from the ceremony. An amazing lady.